Saving Sighthill Stones

The Sighthill Stone Circle is a modern astronomically-aligned stone ring that was designed and built in 1979 under the direction of local astronomer and SF writer Duncan Lunan. It is situated in the centre of Glasgow right next to the M8 motorway, and is almost certainly the first astronomically-aligned circle built in Scotland for over 3000 years (I have blogged about it before here and here). When I first dowsed the circle many years ago, it looked pretty neglected and I was unable to dowse any earth energies of interest within it. All ancient stone rings (as well as many … Continue reading Saving Sighthill Stones

Beyond Hope in Rambo Country

At the Canadian Society of Questers’ Conference in Harrison Hot Springs, British Columbia at the beginning of May, Conference organiser Merlin Beltain told a tale over breakfast one day about a strong energy vortex that, as far as I could gather, was somewhere in the vicinity (bear in mind that my geographic knowledge of BC was rudimentary at best at this point). It seemed to be centred on a river valley where some old disused railway tunnels were carved through the mountain and, said Merlin, the tunnels contained a ‘time portal’. Needless to say, this was a fascinating topic of … Continue reading Beyond Hope in Rambo Country

Gardner’s Double Appleton

Labyrinthine revelations… a gift from Troy Farm. A version of this article was published in The Labyrinth Society’s publication ‘Labyrinth Pathways’ no. 5, Sept. 2011 I have long been a fan of the Appleton labyrinth dance ‘discovered’ by Jon Appleton and popularised ever since at almost every meeting of labyrinth aficionados (if you don’t know what an ‘Appleton’ is, click here for details). Recently I had the privilege of having the 15-circuit Classical Troy Farm labyrinth near Somerton to play in for the weekend with a group of students on a course I was teaching for the British Society of … Continue reading Gardner’s Double Appleton

Dowsing Belinus

The Belinus Line is a long-distance alignment, similar to the Michael Line, running the length of the UK from the Isle of Wight up to Inverhope on the north coast of Scotland, passing through Winchester, Birmingham, Manchester, Carlisle, Dunfermline, Pitlochry and Lairg on the way. Like the Michael Line, it has twin male and female serpentine energy currents weaving around the straight line and connecting many ancient sites. Gary Biltcliffe has been researching this alignment for around 20 years now, and his book documenting his odyssey is almost completed. Have a look at his website for more information. Gary and … Continue reading Dowsing Belinus

“Is it like Feng-Shui?”

An article published in the Spring 2011 issue of the WHG magazine. That’s probably the most common question I get asked when trying to explain what geomancy is. It’s also the easiest explanation for most people to grasp.  I can say, “Geomancy is the art of placing structures upon the Earth so that they are in harmony with the telluric energies”; or perhaps, “Geomancy is the art of designing and constructing spaces that enhance our connection to spirit”; but few people can understand what it’s about until you mention that it’s ‘like Western Feng-Shui’. Western geomancy is based on three … Continue reading “Is it like Feng-Shui?”

Walk away winter blues with a snow labyrinth

If you’re suffering from the heavy snow plaguing the country just now and are feeling a bit depressed about the weather, or if your kids are bored with building snowmen and you’re looking for something else to entertain them, why not make a snow labyrinth? They look great, give you a real sense of achievement when you’ve made one; and then of course you have a labyrinth that you can walk again and again – at least until the snow melts. Constructing a snow labyrinth is a little trickier than normal. Usually when drawing a labyrinth, you construct it from … Continue reading Walk away winter blues with a snow labyrinth

There’s Something About St. Mary’s

Sacred Geometry and the Golden Proportion. It’s not just St. Mary’s. It could just as easily be St. George’s, St. Michael’s, or any other church you care to name. Indeed, there is an indefinable ‘something’ about many of our older churches and cathedrals, especially the great Gothic cathedrals of the middle Ages. But what exactly is that ‘something’? What is it that makes a structure a good place for spiritual working? What gives it that numinous quality that leads us to define the space as sacred? Any dowser will tell you that almost all of our sacred structures, from the … Continue reading There’s Something About St. Mary’s

Machrie Moor landscape for Stellarium

After visiting a client on Arran a couple of weeks ago, I took the opportunity for a quick visit to Machrie Moor, which is about the closest thing Scotland has to a megalithic theme park. There are at least five sites in the complex, all very close together but of very different designs, as though the builders were experimenting to find out what worked best. One of the sites in particular has some spectacularly tall megaliths of a wonderful red sandstone – you can see some of these in the distance if you look to the north-east in this Stellarium … Continue reading Machrie Moor landscape for Stellarium

Callanish landscape for Stellarium

Ever since I saw the major southern standstill of the moon at Callanish on the Western Isles in 2006 (see my article The Song of the Low Moon), I’ve been wanting to recreate it using  the open-source astronomy program Stellarium. It’s taken longer than anticipated, but that dream has now been fulfilled. Earlier this year, I was working on a show in Stornoway, and took the opportunity to drive out to the stones one morning when things were quiet. Nobody was about and I had the site to myself. I took GPS readings at the northern end of the avenue … Continue reading Callanish landscape for Stellarium

Archaeoastronomy, Avebury and Crop Circles

I’ve just returned from a weekend teaching course in Avebury, where I was tutoring 16 students through the BSD’s Earth Energies Level 4 course ‘Understanding Earth Energy Power Centres and Features of Special Geomantic Significance’ . It’s probably the most academic and ‘left-brain’ of all the Earth Energy courses as it covers topics including sacred geometry and celestial mechanics – not the easiest material to teach even when you are interested in the subject. However, everyone seemed to enjoy themselves and we had a good time exploring the Avebury complex of sites, visiting West Kennet long barrow, Swallowhead Spring and … Continue reading Archaeoastronomy, Avebury and Crop Circles