Walk away winter blues with a snow labyrinth

If you’re suffering from the heavy snow plaguing the country just now and are feeling a bit depressed about the weather, or if your kids are bored with building snowmen and you’re looking for something else to entertain them, why not make a snow labyrinth? They look great, give you a real sense of achievement when you’ve made one; and then of course you have a labyrinth that you can walk again and again – at least until the snow melts. Constructing a snow labyrinth is a little trickier than normal. Usually when drawing a labyrinth, you construct it from … Continue reading Walk away winter blues with a snow labyrinth

Electrosensitivity: Is your mobile really a threat to your health?

There was a very good article in Metro today about electrosensitivity – it’s well worth a read. Insomnia is one of the biggest effects of ES and Weeks says this lack of sleep affects our immune systems and our ability to repair and fight infections. ‘A study by scientists in America categorically showed that having your mobile phone by your bed at night affects your ability to go into a deep sleep,’ he says. ‘This is sufficient evidence to show that mobile phones don’t allow us to go into a deep REM [Rapid Eye Movement] sleep, thus preventing us from … Continue reading Electrosensitivity: Is your mobile really a threat to your health?

There’s Something About St. Mary’s

Sacred Geometry and the Golden Proportion. It’s not just St. Mary’s. It could just as easily be St. George’s, St. Michael’s, or any other church you care to name. Indeed, there is an indefinable ‘something’ about many of our older churches and cathedrals, especially the great Gothic cathedrals of the middle Ages. But what exactly is that ‘something’? What is it that makes a structure a good place for spiritual working? What gives it that numinous quality that leads us to define the space as sacred? Any dowser will tell you that almost all of our sacred structures, from the … Continue reading There’s Something About St. Mary’s

Machrie Moor landscape for Stellarium

After visiting a client on Arran a couple of weeks ago, I took the opportunity for a quick visit to Machrie Moor, which is about the closest thing Scotland has to a megalithic theme park. There are at least five sites in the complex, all very close together but of very different designs, as though the builders were experimenting to find out what worked best. One of the sites in particular has some spectacularly tall megaliths of a wonderful red sandstone – you can see some of these in the distance if you look to the north-east in this Stellarium … Continue reading Machrie Moor landscape for Stellarium

Dowsers hope more people will twig the ancient art

Dowsers hope more people will twig the ancient art. A very positive report on the British Society of Dowsers’ annual conference from Geoff Ward: A new scientific investigation into how dowsing works should help to raise the profile of the British Society of Dowsers, its annual conference heard Dowsing has moved a long way from the forked hazel twig and its traditional roots of water and minerals divining to tracing earth energies – its biggest growth area – improving health and well-being, locating archaeological remains and even to archaeo-astronomy. Two hundred aficionados of the rods and pendulum attended the British … Continue reading Dowsers hope more people will twig the ancient art

Callanish landscape for Stellarium

Ever since I saw the major southern standstill of the moon at Callanish on the Western Isles in 2006 (see my article The Song of the Low Moon), I’ve been wanting to recreate it using  the open-source astronomy program Stellarium. It’s taken longer than anticipated, but that dream has now been fulfilled. Earlier this year, I was working on a show in Stornoway, and took the opportunity to drive out to the stones one morning when things were quiet. Nobody was about and I had the site to myself. I took GPS readings at the northern end of the avenue … Continue reading Callanish landscape for Stellarium

Is Your Bed Giving You Cancer?

Dr. Douglas Fields: Left-Sided Cancer–Should You Blame Your Bed and TV? Finally! A study that supports what some of us have been saying for years – that metal springs in mattresses act as wave-guides and amplify EMF’s from television and FM signals. …the length of a bed is half the wavelength of FM and TV transmissions that have been broadcasting since the late 1940s. In Japan most beds are not made of metal, and the TV broadcast system does not use the 87- to 108-megahertz frequency used in Western countries. Thus, as we sleep on our coil-spring mattresses, we are … Continue reading Is Your Bed Giving You Cancer?

Archaeoastronomy, Avebury and Crop Circles

I’ve just returned from a weekend teaching course in Avebury, where I was tutoring 16 students through the BSD’s Earth Energies Level 4 course ‘Understanding Earth Energy Power Centres and Features of Special Geomantic Significance’ . It’s probably the most academic and ‘left-brain’ of all the Earth Energy courses as it covers topics including sacred geometry and celestial mechanics – not the easiest material to teach even when you are interested in the subject. However, everyone seemed to enjoy themselves and we had a good time exploring the Avebury complex of sites, visiting West Kennet long barrow, Swallowhead Spring and … Continue reading Archaeoastronomy, Avebury and Crop Circles

Sighthill Solstice Sunset

I managed to attend Duncan’s talk about the Sighthill stones on the summer solstice, followed up by a walk up to the circle to see the sunset. I’ve certainly never seen so many folk at the circle before, and we were blessed with clear skies for the event. I was keen to see how the real thing compared with my Stellarium landscape, and was pleasantly surprised to see that it was pretty accurate. Here’s a picture of things in Stellarium: …and here’s the real thing, taken looking over the centre stone, which of course you don’t see in the Stellarium … Continue reading Sighthill Solstice Sunset

Good Heavens … astronomer bids to rejuvenate stone circle

Good Heavens … astronomer bids to rejuvenate stone circle – Herald Scotland | News | Home News. 2 Jun 2010 It was created in the late 1970s to mirror the rise and fall of the moon and sun across Glasgow on a site of ancient astronomical interest. Now efforts are being made to rejuvenate the Sighthill Stone Circle, created by amateur astronomer and science writer Duncan Lunan, who brought Britain’s first authentically alligned stone circle in more than 3000 years to Glasgow’s inner city. More than 30 years later, Lunan hopes to revive interest in the stone circle, which was … Continue reading Good Heavens … astronomer bids to rejuvenate stone circle